Photos

Dangerous Monster in Wardija

submitted by St Michael School St Venera : Etienne Degabriele Ferrante  for Age Group: 11-14
dissemination(s): school-media
filed under Photos

Wardija is one of the few remaining spots where we can still have a lovely walk among nature. One can admire lots of plant, insect and bird species in their natural habitat.During a walk there, I noticed this monstruosity. I learned that it was an oil-filled high-voltage transformer used for the distribution of electricity. I discovered that the electromagnetic field generated from this transformer and from the power lines attached to it, are not just ugly for the sight. They are potentially very dangerous. In humans and animals they cause cancer and dna problems, among others, while in plants they stunt growth, reproduction and production of chlorophyll. Due to rust, the oil could also leak, so polluting the water bed. A possible solution would be to pass the lines underground and placing the transformer in a girna, onto an oil-containment bund. Less risk of contamination, better for the sight.



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Wonderful Water! Water of Life.

submitted by St Michael School St Venera : Etienne Degabriele Ferrante  for Age Group: 11-14
dissemination(s): school-media
filed under Photos

Fresh water is not easily available in Malta. We need to keep places like Chadwick lakes clean from all pollutants, so that all aquifers will have fresh water available. In Malta we find that from the few aquifers that still exist, not all can be used to draw water, one reason being the presence of pollutants. Even if we simply consider Chadwick lakes, we find a good sized area that is overgrown with tiny plants. These are a result of fertilisers and other chemicals that dissolve into rainwater from the soil in fields, and end up in the ‘lakes’. To make matters worse, I noticed plastic bottles and other litter in the water. Let us not use progress and convenience as an excuse to neglect and destroy natural life in Malta. Water is the source of all life. So let us take care of our Wonderful Water, Water of life!



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Book Exchange for Waste Reduction Week

submitted by Mater Boni Consilii School Paola St. Joseph : Aimee Drew, Kayleigh Ellul, Martina Cassar  for Age Group: 11-14
dissemination(s): other, Wasteserv Malta Facebook Page, website
filed under Photos

We collected plastic buckets from each class and covered them in old newspapers. To make them more creative, the teachers bought us some spraying cans and we sprayed inside the buckets with highlighted colours. Every class got some old books that they didn’t use anymore. This was our idea for the European Week for Waste Reduction.



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From the Older Generation … Let’s Recycle & Reuse

submitted by Girls Secondary St.Ignatius College : Aimee Mallia  for Age Group: 11-14
dissemination(s): elink, other
filed under Photos

This photo is sent to promote the 3Rs



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Together … Let’s spread the word

submitted by Girls Secondary St.Ignatius College : Kurt Bartolo  for Age Group: 11-14
dissemination(s): Facebook, other
filed under Photos

This photo shows the EKoskola group spread the information about appropriate waste management in the heart of our cities and villages.



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Blown by the wind

submitted by St. Margaret College Boys Secondary Verdala : Kynan Grech  for Age Group: 11-14
dissemination(s): Annual Exhibition, newspaper, other, school-magazine, website
filed under Photos

Recently strong winds hit the area of Bypass Road Ghaxaq bending down some of the new planted trees with one of them in particular at the risk of falling down. Heavy winds can do lots of damage to trees than just rustle leaves. Prevailing winds that happen from daily and seasonal changes can affect the growth, form, and very survival of trees. So arborists should take into consideration the impact of wind on trees as this affects the quality of nursery stock and growth of trees planted. Wind is an important factor to be considered when selecting the right tree for a planting site. On contacting the Major of Ghaxaq Local Council I was referred to the Malta Transport and Infrastructure Authority whom they then contacted the Deputy Manager of the Environmental Landscapes Consortium Ltd for immediate intervention and rehabilitation of this tree risking falling down and dying.



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Educational Waste

submitted by Gzira St.Monica School : Laura Moschetti  for Age Group: 11-14
dissemination(s): Exhibition, other, school-media, Special Assembly
filed under Photos

WasteServ and authorised compliance schemes frequently carry out educational campaigns targeted at waste producers. Targeted educational initiatives include talks and educational games in schools and waste management training for companies and government departments. Furthermore, they participate regularly in local community events with stands to promote sustainable waste management practices. Despite this, whilst strolling through the site visited by Malta’s intellectuals, i.e. the University track, numerous amounts of waste can be observed lying around! People are being lazy and throw their trash around as if no one can see it! In fact data for the year 2012 shows that the total waste requiring disposal generated in Malta was of 1,500,777 tonnes, 1,147,230 tonnes (99.8%) of which being disposed of in Malta. (http://environment.gov.mt/) How much of this waste is carelessly thrown away in public places?



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Trapped in the Net

submitted by St. Margaret College Boys Secondary Verdala : Luke Agius  for Age Group: 11-14
dissemination(s): Annual School Exhibition, newspaper, other, school-magazine, website
filed under Photos

A dead Scopoli’s Shearwater (in Maltese ‘Ciefa’) was noticed on shore at Gnejna Bay. This scene shocked many Maltese people and tourists who happened to be at Gnejna Bay on Saturday, 14th March 2015. I reckon the orange line this bird got entangled in and most probably drowned was an anchor or floater line of fishing net or of other fishing gear. I doubt that the line was placed deliberately to catch/kill the bird. This kind of litter is unfortunately commonly found in the sea and imposes a high risk for seabirds, turtles and dolphins alike. Raising awareness amongst fishermen and other sea users is very important. Lines and other litter should be always brought back to shore and floating litter be picked up from the sea when found. Bird Life Malta was informed for further investigation and prevention.



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Grey Skies

submitted by Gzira St.Monica School : Lea Ungaro  for Age Group: 11-14
dissemination(s): Exhibition, other, school-media, Special Assembly
filed under Photos

Grey skies hover above the little island of Malta. Smoke from Malta’s Power Station is polluting the air above it. Although power stations are regulated by laws to protect human health and the environment, there is a wide variation of environmental impacts associated with power generation technologies. Burning oil at power stations produces nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and mercury compounds. The amount of sulphur dioxide and mercury compounds can vary greatly depending on the sulphur and mercury content of the oil that is burned. Oil-fired power stations use large quantities of water for steam production and cooling. When oil-fired power plants remove water from the sea, fish and aquatic life can be killed, affecting those animals and people who depend on these aquatic resources. Power stations release treated wastewater, which can contain pollutants and is generally hotter that the water in nearby seas, often harming fish and plants. (http://www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/energy-and-you/affect/oil.html)



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The BFG’s

submitted by Gozo College Boys Secondary School : Anthony Joe Borg  for Age Group: 11-14
dissemination(s): other, school noticeboard, school-magazine, website
filed under Photos

The sun and wind have been around for ever. They have been giving us energy since time immemorial and humans have always found ways of harnessing this energy for their daily life. One such example is the myriad of windmills which can be found on our islands although many are not in a good state of conservation…it’s a pity that sometimes we forget how useful these can still be today.



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