Best Entry

Solar Bulb

submitted by G.F Abela Junior College University of Malta : Marie Therese Pavia  for 15-18
campaign: yre-entry
dissemination(s): newspaper, school media, tv, website
filed under campaigning-photo Photos
awarded: Best Entry, Finalist

An ordinary bulb lit by the setting sun and power lines in the background recall the urgent need to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels and invest more in solar energy sources. A sustainable future depends highly on renewable energy sources.



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Your environmental footprint – Walking with, or against, nature?

submitted by G.F Abela Junior College University of Malta : Marie Therese Pavia  for 15-18
campaign: yre-entry
dissemination(s): newspaper, school media, tv, website
filed under campaigning-photo Photos
awarded: Best Entry

All your actions and choices have some impact on the environment. It’s up to you to decide to what extent. Hence, by making sustainable choices, you can reduce your environmental footprint.



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Fighting for survival…is the environment worth fighting for?

submitted by St Benedict College Middle School Kirkop : EkoSkola Committee  for 11-14
campaign: litter-less-campaign-entry
dissemination(s): newspaper, school magazine, school media, website
filed under Photos reporting-photo
awarded: Best Entry, Commended, Finalist



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A Changing Skyline

submitted by St.Dorothy's Senior School : Kyra Abela  for 11-14
campaign: yre-entry
dissemination(s): school media, website
filed under campaigning-photo Photos
awarded: Best Entry

“Due to our limited land mass, more high-rise buildings will be constructed in the future.” – Parliamentary Secretary for Planning and the Property Market. The Real Estate in Malta is booming, and our views have changed into a surreal landscape. Everywhere you look you see apartments, planning authority sites, road construction, and the list goes on. What is happening to the limited amount of green areas we have in Malta? Is the construction more important than the greenery which gives off oxygen essential for us to live? Is it really that important? Meanwhile us students are trying to save what is left using one break at a time, planting one crop at a time….



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Save for the Future

submitted by Maria Regina College Dun Manwel Attard Young Adult Education Resource Centre : Liam Farrugia  for 19+
campaign: yre-entry
dissemination(s): Facebook, noticeboard, other, school media, website
filed under Photos reporting-photo
awarded: Best Entry, HSBC Award, Shortlisted internationally

Only by carefully measuring our choices and being responsible when it comes to our impact on the world’s natural resources can we ensure that generations to come can still live in a healthy and rich environment.



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Perfection… it’s me you’re looking for!

submitted by Maria Regina College Dun Manwel Attard Young Adult Education Resource Centre : Nicole Marie Muscat  for 15-18
campaign: yre-entry
dissemination(s): Facebook, noticeboard, other, school media, website
filed under Photos reporting-photo
awarded: Best Entry, Shortlisted internationally

Not all that glitters is gold! The shiny apple is coated in wax which is unnecessary and potentially toxic, even if it makes the apple appear more attractive. People tend to favour shiny ones – its appearance mimics freshness and flavour…but that is not necessarily the case! Eating natural produce that is not refined or processed is always a healthier option and poses less threats on our health and less demands on our planet. Even if they look less attractive, going for a natural option, the way mother nature intended, is often a better choice.



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Green Hedgehog

submitted by Maria Regina College Mosta : Hayley Cilia  for 15-18
campaign: YRE Entry
dissemination(s): school media, website
filed under Photos Reporting photo
awarded: Best Entry, WasteServ Award

Reusing plastic objects giving them a second life is done regularly at Maria Regina College Mosta, where students research ways how to reuse waste and actually work together to make this happen. A cute soft hedgehog welcomes students into the garden where there are other various recycled objects that students can see and use. This is a simple example of how with some creativity lots of waste can be given a new life and eventually help in reducing the huge waste problem we have in Malta. Teaching is not just done through lessons, but mainly through presenting real live scenarios and solutions.



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Don’t Crush Me!

submitted by Mater Boni Consilii St. Joseph Paola : Elisa Sacco  for 11-14
campaign: YRE Entry
dissemination(s): other, school media, Social Media, website
filed under Photos Reporting photo
awarded: Best Entry

Why do you have to crush me by stepping on me? Would you like it if someone stepped on you?



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Never ending sunset- Light Pollution

submitted by Mcast Art & Design Mosta : Luke Zerafa  for 19+
campaign: YRE Entry
dissemination(s): newspaper, school magazine, school media, website
filed under Photos Reporting photo
awarded: Best Entry, International Honorable Mention

Dangers of Light Pollution: Nature: animals confuse artificial lighting for moon and disrupt their natural cycles Human: Circadian Rhythms- Controlled by ‘Ganglion cells’ found inside the eye, controlling the sleep/ wake/ eat cycle + Behavioural functions + pupillary light reflex (dilation of the pupil)- how much light enters the eye and how much we perceive. Ganglion cells have a peak absorption rate of around 480 nM wavelength (blue light) In short: Wrong colour temperature bluish light pollution has greater effect on our sleep/ wake/ eat cycles (circadian) + Behaviour functions Installing too powerful lighting instead of finding the proper low wattage to produce an adequate amount of luminosity results in light pollution from the reflected surface just under the light source. Waste of electricity to light unused spaces.



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Pesticides…Danger in a bottle but safe in my food?

submitted by Maria Regina College Dun Manwel Attard Young Adult Education Resource Centre : Harrison Bugeja  for 19+
dissemination(s): other, Our Resource Centre Facebook Page, website
filed under Photos
awarded: Best Entry, WER Award

Nowadays most farmers use more pesticides on crops to destroy insects, weeds, fungi, bacteria, and other things that feed on crops and spread diseases among others. Farmers are determined to gain profit as much as possible. Therefore they make sure that they get the crop yield they desire without considering the consequence of disregarding the harm they are causing to the environment and to consumers indirectly.



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