11-14

Wells

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Stefan Portelli  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school media
filed under Photos

In this picture there is a well in a Maltese home. Wells are becoming rare features in Maltese homes not only because people are living in smaller houses but also because wells are seen as added expense. Nearly 16% of the Maltese run-off water is wasted and the decrease in the number of wells in Malta is one of the main reasons why this water is being wasted. Maybe Local councils could help by creating various initiatives to have wells in houses to reduce the amount of run-off water that is being wasted. It is interesting to note that when Valetta was being built, the Knights of the Order of St. John, made the provision of wells compulsory for every house that was going to be constructed. It is high time that such regulations would be laid down and enforced once again!



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Fort Manoel

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Fabrizio Zammit  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school media
filed under Photos

This breathtaking view is a part of the Maltese Archipelago. It is taken from the Sliema seafront. The magnificent Fort shown, has just been restored. You could also see the difference between the abandoned houses at the bottom of the photo and Fort Manoel. The purpose of the Fort was to protect the natural Marsamxett harbour. At the lower part of the island there was once a hospital for people who were infected with a disease known as the plague. The Hospital was called Lazaretto hospital. This picture clearly shows how the Knights made good use of the promontories available without creating uneccesary eyesores! Fort Manoel in fact blends in easily with the natural surroundings. We should make use of such good practices in all construction projects!



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Nature’s Three elements

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Gilmor Formosa  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school media
filed under Photos

Siggiewi also known as Città Ferdinand is one of the most beautiful places in Malta. Siggiewi can be a suitable place for a person who loves the peacefulness and tranquillity that only nature can provide. This photo was taken from a high place in the south-east of Siggiewi. I named it the three elements of nature because it shows the three elements which are water, earth and the wind. In summer the water that you can see in the picture evaporates and in winter it will be filled with rain water providings clean sources of fresh water. The picture also indicates the farmers' good use of arable land – creating numerous terraced fields on the otherwise unusable slopes!



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Nature’s Garden

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Myles Beerman  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school media
filed under Photos

This picture shows a lovely piece of art which is covered with trees and beautiful flowers which opens to this lovely garden were you can relax watching the trees and the melody of the birds. This picture is showing that nature can be beautiful and colourful.. The gate shows that when you enter that gate you are entering a completely different world where you can relax and enjoy some free time. The windmill is symbolizing the wind. The pathway takes you to different places where you can find ponds and all the other boundless marvels that nature has to offer.



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San Anton Gardens – a botanical gem

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Jack Cassar  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school media
filed under Photos

The most famous public gardens of Malta, San Anton Gardens, were laid out by Grand Master Antoine de Paule as grounds for his summer residence, San Anton Palace. Successive Grand Masters enhanced and embellished the gardens, which have been open to the public since 1882. San Anton gardens are an environmental gem with graceful walkways, sculptures, ornamental pools, families of ducks, swans, birds and tortoises, and a small aviary. The gardens are a botanical delight with large variety of trees and plants from around the world, including cypress, jacarandas, palm trees and exotic plants which some of them are over three hundred years old. Such is the splendor of San Anton Gardens, that nowadays events including the Malta Horticultural show, open-air theater, drama and musical performances are held there.



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Dump site in Attard

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Matthias Grech  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school media
filed under Photos

The picture shows a very big field full of bright flowers full of life and in this field there is possibly the biggest contrast that you could ever imagine, an enormous pile of rocks, nearly like a small hill. Surprisingly enough this used to be a quarry. Although filling up the quarry with uneccessary construction waste was a great sustainable effort, unfortunately it seems to have gone quite of hand since the construction waste has kept on accumulating forming the looming hill that can be seen at the back of the picture. While such sustainable efforts should be promoted, necessary care should also be given not to go overboard as shown above. This effects the not only the flora of the area but also the possible underlying water tables which can easily be contaminated if other types of waste are thrown in the area.



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Marsaxlokk

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Jacques Leon Patiniott  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school media
filed under Photos

What a wonderful view of Marsaxlokk harbour. But wait…What’s that in the background? It is Delimara’s Power Station and it is ruining the view!! It is also polluting the air around it with the fumes the chimneys are omitting and it isn’t very healthy for people who live in the areas of Delimara either. It also has a very bad impact on the tourists which come to visit Marsaxlokk .And what about the impact on the environment, especially the fish in the sea and the birds? The fishermen are the most affected by this monster. If we become more aware of energy consumption and its consequences it will be easier for all of us to decrease our reliance on fossil fuels. We must all understand that every drop counts and that undoubtedly all our efforts do make a difference.



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Fresh water streams

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Luke Sciberras  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school media
filed under Photos

As you can see in the picture above there is natural spring water found in Landrijiet, limits of Rabat, which is contaminated by illegal dumping. It is a great pity that only a few people know about it. After a rainy day this spring has a lot more water than shown in the picture above. Maybe clear signs with adequate information should be placed in the vicinity not only to prohibit people from dumping unwanted items in the stream but also to explain the ecological importance of such freshwater streams. Fresh water habitats such as these can be home to various species such as the painted frog and the Maltese fresh water crab. Both species are becoming endangered so more awareness is required!



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What do you want?

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Kyle Gatt  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school media
filed under Photos

Waste production in the Maltese Islands is a major problem and several actions need to be taken in order to act for the future generations. Some waste components have economic value and can be recycled and correctly recovered. In the first two pictures we can see a discarded piece of furniture . If one calls the local council , they’ll send someone to collect it for free instead of throwing it away and damaging the environment! On the other hand , in the second two pictures we can see two pristine country views on the Maltese islands. It’s all depends on us basically!



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One construction site

submitted by The Archbishop's Seminary : Kurt Demicoli  for 11-14
dissemination(s): school media
filed under Photos

Don’t you think that our country, Malta is becoming one massive construction site? Everyone is thinking about one aspect, MONEY – but unfortunately we sometimes fail to realise that it does not always make the world go round! This picture shows and already constructed block of apartments and another block to be constructed (in background). Both construction projects encroach on the already limited agricultural land. Besides this, construction also implies destruction of natural areas and therefore loss of endemic or indigenous species. Maybe we cannot always stop development but we can always do our best to learn more. Loss of land and species will eventually effect us all.



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